Tag Archive | Greenhouse

Planting Indoors

plants balls terairum planters When you are planting indoors, you may want to consider the planters that are crystal clear to watch them grow. These are terrarium type planters and that means a lot of the nutrients they receive comes from the oxygen they produce. You can hang them in the bathroom for extra moisture or place them on tables for more light and for the beauty of them.  What ever you choose, they will be lovely….

April…It Is Time To Plant

April

Asparagus – if you’re planting crowns, now’s the time to establish the bed.
Aubergines – start these off on a windowsill, in a propagator or greenhouse.
Beans (French) – sow these outdoors under a cloche.
Beetroot – sow the seeds this month.
Broad beans – sow the seeds this month.
Broccoli – sow in shallow drills, this month and next.
Brussels sprouts – plant out now for harvesting in September.
Cabbages – summer varieties can be sown now but keep them under cloches.
Carrots – early varieties can be sown now but keep them under cloches.
Cauliflowers – summer varieties can be sown now but keep them under cloches.
Celery – start these off on a windowsill, in a propagator or greenhouse.
Chard – once the last of the hard frosts is over, sow outdoors.
Cucumbers – start these off on a windowsill, in a propagator or greenhouse.
Kohlrabi – sow at intervals to ensure a constant crop.
Leeks – space them about 30cm apart in shallow drills.
Lettuce (including rocket) – sow undercover in a greenhouse or indoors.
Onions – if the weather is good enough, plant these out now.
Peas – early varieties could be planted out now in milder parts of the UK.
Peppers – start these off on a windowsill, in a propagator or greenhouse.
Potatoes – plant out earlies that have been chitting for the past few weeks.
Radishes – sow at intervals to ensure a constant crop.
Shallots – if the weather is good enough, plant these out now.
Spinach – reseed every couple of weeks to get a constant crop.
Spinach Beet – reseed every couple of weeks to get a constant crop.
Sweetcorn – sow these outdoors but under a cloche.
Tomatoes – start these off on a windowsill, in a propagator or greenhouse.
Turnips – early varieties can be planted out now.

Growing Herbs

HERBS
herb

Herbal-Elegance-lg_A4

potsherb

How To Grow Herbs

herbs in pots

How To Grow Herbs In Pots

How To Create A Herb Garden

Mums

It’s Fall-Time for Mums

The summer gardens are dead and gone. It’s time for fall mums! Fall is my favorite time of year. There’s a chill in the air; it’s time to pick apples and pumpkins; school football teams are competing; leaves are changing color, but it’s just not fall for me until I go select and purchase a fall mum for my deck.

Each year, I’d help my mother tend hundreds of hardy mums in her greenhouses as we prepared for the busy autumn selling season. During the summer, we’d pinch back the mums so that they would end up bushy and full instead of spindly. We’d also fertilize each individual pot too.

My mother is retired now, so this year, for the first time in a long time, I’ve had to visit someone else’s greenhouse to choose my annual mum.

It’s hard choosing a mum because they are all beautiful. There are several different types of mums: daisy, spoon types, spider mums, and football mums. Mums come in many different colors too. I’ve seen white mums; various pinks-from light pink to a deep, rich magenta; burgundy, purple, orange, yellow, rust, red, and mums in different combinations of colors.

If you’d like a mum for your fall decorating, mums labeled “hardy” or “garden” are what you want. Mums used to be a nickname for “chrysanthemums”, but the name has now been changed to the tongue-twisting “dendranthema x grandiflora”.

I simply display my fall mum on my deck, enjoying it until a really hard frost finally turns it black. If you prefer, you can plant your mums in the garden instead.

If you’re going to plant your mum in the garden, make sure it has sun for at least half the day, though it would do well in the sun all day too. Make sure there is good drainage in your garden, and the soil should be moist, but not soggy.

There is no need to fertilize your fall mum. All you need to do is mulch it with some straw. In the spring you can remove the straw, remove any dead plant matter, then re-mulch with wood chips. Once the mum starts growing in the spring, keep new growth “pinched back” so that it doesn’t get spindly, but stop pinching back once the end of summer arrives.

One of my favorite things to do in the fall is to drive around looking at how everyone uses fall mums to decorate their homes. Some people are very creative and design very attractive arrangements using mums, pumpkins, gourds, corn stalks, bales of hay, and scarecrows.

Mums require very little care, and can be enjoyed from the end of summer until after several frosts.