Tag Archive | food

Planting Indoors

plants balls terairum planters When you are planting indoors, you may want to consider the planters that are crystal clear to watch them grow. These are terrarium type planters and that means a lot of the nutrients they receive comes from the oxygen they produce. You can hang them in the bathroom for extra moisture or place them on tables for more light and for the beauty of them.  What ever you choose, they will be lovely….

8 Ways To Preserve Fresh Cut Flowers

Did you know?????

Aspirin

It’s a tried-and-true way to keep roses and other cut flowers fresh longer: Put a crushed aspirin in the water before adding your flowers. Other household items that you can put in the water to extend the life of your flower arrangements include: a multivitamin, a teaspoon of sugar, a pinch of salt and baking soda, and even a copper penny. Also, don’t forget to change the vase water every few days.

See more uses for Aspirin.

Bleach

Freshly cut flowers will stay fresh longer if you add 1/4 teaspoon bleach per quart (1 liter) of vase water. Another popular recipe calls for 3 drops bleach and 1 teaspoon sugar in 1 quart (1 liter) water. This will also keep the water from getting cloudy and inhibit the growth of bacteria.

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Coins

Your posies and other cut flowers will stay fresh longer if you add a copper penny and a cube of sugar to the vase water.

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Hair Spray

Just as it preserves your hairstyle, a spritz of hair spray can preserve your cut flowers. Stand a foot away from the bouquet and give them a quick spray, just on the undersides of the leaves and petals.

Soda

Don’t throw away those last drops of soda. Pour about 1/4 cup into the water in a vase full of cut flowers. The sugar in the soda will make the blossoms last longer. Note: If you have a clear vase and want the water to remain clear, use a clear soda, like Sprite or 7-Up.

See more uses for Soda Pop.

Sugar

Make your own preservative to keep cut flowers fresh longer. Dissolve 3 tablespoons sugar and 2 tablespoons white vinegar per quart (liter) of warm water. When you fill the vase, make sure the cut stems are covered by 3-4 inches (7-10 centimeters) of the prepared water. The sugar nourishes the plants, while the vinegar inhibits bacterial growth. You’ll be surprised how long the arrangement stays fresh!

Vinegar

Everyone likes to keep cut flowers around as long as possible, and there are several good methods. One way is to mix 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar and 2 tablespoons sugar with the vase water before adding the flowers. Be sure to change the water (with more vinegar and sugar, of course) every few days to enhance your flowers’ longevity.

See more uses for Vinegar.

Growing Fresh Tomatoes

Growing a great tomato garden is simple if you follow a few simple rules. You understand when you bite into a juicy tomato that it is largely water. Over 95% actually, and this means you can’t allow this plant to get too dry. As soon as it is too dry, it will get a condition called Blossom End Rot where the end of the tomato goes black, shrinks up and looks like a fungus has hit it. It’s a water-related problem.

There are instruction books on gardening at http://astore.amazon.com/colormeplantswebs-20


This is also a temperature problem; when the spring temperatures are too cold for the pollen and the fruit isn’t properly pollinated, the fruit will abort. This is one reason we plant tomatoes when the ground is warm and there is absolutely no danger of frost or cold summer nights.

Growing Tomatoes

Growing a great tomato garden is simple if you follow a few simple rules. You understand when you bite into a juicy tomato that it is largely water. Over 95% actually, and this means you can’t allow this plant to get too dry. As soon as it is too dry, it will get a condition called Blossom End Rot where the end of the tomato goes black, shrinks up and looks like a fungus has hit it. It’s a water-related problem.

There are instruction books on gardening at http://astore.amazon.com/colormeplantswebs-20


This is also a temperature problem; when the spring temperatures are too cold for the pollen and the fruit isn’t properly pollinated, the fruit will abort. This is one reason we plant tomatoes when the ground is warm and there is absolutely no danger of frost or cold summer nights.